Apple, Cloud, featured, IT, Mobility

Google Pushes Apple To Improve iOS 7 For Business Users

12 Jun , 2013  

iOS_7Thank you Google Android for pushing Apple to bring iOS current with iOS 7, sort of. Talk to most anyone and they are mildly excited about the coming changes to the iPhone/iPad operating system. While many of us, business users included, still love our iPhone and iPad devices, true innovations in iOS have been slow in coming. Apple has been unable to match the pace of innovation of Android devices. Many of iOS 7’s new features can be directly attributed to existing features in other versions of Android.

iOS 7 is more of a UI facelift than a leap in innovation, with very useful additions such as easy access to common settings, Activation Lock, multitasking, auto updating of apps, and more notification improvements (which recent iOS 6 updates struggled to improve). But the new “flat” UI design along with these useful improvements are just that, improvements, not the true innovations we expect from Apple. iOS 7 shows Apple is playing catch up more than staking out any claim that iOS 7 is a mobile OS game changer.

There are important features in iOS 7 business users will find helpful. AirDrop means less emailing and texting of photos and contacts to someone nearby, make FaceTime VoiP calls over Wi-Fi to save cell phone minutes and international roaming charges, the new Control Center makes switching in and out of Airplane Mode quicker when getting on and off the plane while juggling your carry on bag, seamless automatic joining to wi-fi networks that support the Wi-Fi Alliance’s Passpoint technology, and a small but helpful feature is the Clock app icon now shows the correct time including second hand movement (sorry, that always bugged me).

ios7_for_businessThese new iOS 7 features are helpful, but as a business and consumer user, I wanted much more from iOS 7. If you aren’t a Pandora user then iTunes Radio is marginally interesting. iWorks apps are very long in the tooth and integrating then into iCloud doesn’t do much for Microsoft Office users, and filters for pictures and built in flashlight features mean a few less 3rd party apps, yawn.

Apple’s web site gives a paragraph description of iOS 7 and business, describing capabilities that make it easier to manage app licenses, wireless configuration, single sign-on, better protection for personal and work data, and data protection for 3rd party apps. But there isn’t even a link to take you to a more in-depth description about iOS 7 and business. I want to hear a lot more about these features and hopefully we will soon.

Short URL to this post: http://goo.gl/J83V8

IBMThis post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet. I’ve been compensated to contribute to this program, but the opinions expressed in this post are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions.

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featured, Mobility

Android Nexus S is Here

19 Dec , 2010  

How will Google’s Android Nexus S smartphone fair? Phones bearing Google’s Android OS continue to gain steam in the marketplace. I see lots of users who probably would have liked an iPhone but have Android phones instead, and seem just as happy with them. A Best Buy email ad just popped into my inbox promoting Google’s own smartphone, the Android Nexus S on T-Mobile. Sales began last Thursday, December 16, and the phone is selling for $199 with a 2 year plan (or $529 with no plan) and is running the latest Android OS 2.3 Gingerbread version. Sales in the UK begin tomorrow.

I don’t own any Android devices…yet…and I haven’t really spent much time on an Android device to really know how well it stacks up to Apple’s IOS 4. But I do have a Samsung Galaxy table coming soon which will close my Android OS experience gap rather quickly. I don’t have plans to move off my iPad anytime soon but if Android proves to be more effective in a business and IT setting, that would be pretty compelling.

Time will tell whether the Nexus S is a better phone than HTC, Motorola and others make. If there’s one potential advantage it’s that the Nexus S may have less (or next to none) bloatware vs. what other manufactures load on. We’ll see on all counts.

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Microsoft, Mobility

You can run but you can’t hide, from Nokia

2 Oct , 2007  

Nokia’s made a very strategic move by announcing their acquisition of Navteq, supplier to over half the markets street and satellite mapping information. Rand McNally, GPSs (personal and automobiles), online mapping services like Google Maps and Yahoo Maps, personal computers, PDAs, and phone manufactures are just a few of their customers. Navteq owns more market share and is considered to have a duopoly with TeleAtlas, their nearest competitor.

As both a competitor to other phone manufactures and keeper of key mapping data, Nokia is holding onto some very valuable information and could also move into markets to compete with Garmin and other GPS products. It’s a surprise Google, Microsoft of some other cash-rich tech-savvy company didn’t buy them up before this, though $8.1B is nothing to sneeze at. Sramana Mitra called attention to this one earlier (here and here). Navteq’s been around for a while (since 1985) and became much more visible when the went public. You didn’t have to re-read Megatrends to figure out the GPS and map information is the current and future currency of mobile computing, especially as hardware, software and services become geo-aware.

Looks like Nokia played this one right and snatched Navteq up before someone else did. There has to be a lot of eyes on TeleAtlas now.

Microsoft, Mobility

Microsoft, Palm, Crackberry, iPhone – Gogglephone calling. It’s for you!

29 Aug , 2007  

It’s rumored that Goggle may announce a new Linux-based phone operating system after Labor Day. As a web 2.0 user and enthusiast I say "wonderful" on several accounts. First, any opportunity for someone to enter the scene and put Windows Mobile Smartphone (what runs on my Motorola Q) to a quick death would get my vote. Even a swift kick might be helpful.

I’ve had Windows Mobile on two phone platforms and nothing could be more painful to endure; the phone reboots itself several times a week, hot keys suddenly go on a Microsoft veteran sabbatical, and I still haven’t figured out how to do a simple 3-way call. I live for the day Verizon carries a viable alternative, like the current Blackberry Pearl. Could a Googlephone be in Verizon’s future? That would be a blessing.

What’s even more exciting about a possible Googlephone is having an open mobile platform in which applications can truly be integrated and interoperate with network web 2.0 apps. Maybe then I could do a 3-way call too. I know, I know – all the iPhone-ers will say get an iPhone but compromising on call quality with Cingular/ATT’s network, and paying the $200 drop charge plus $600 for the phone doesn’t exactly fit into the empty-nester / 2 kids in college gadget budget.

Go Googlephone. I’m excited to see what they have.

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